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beach have been ordered out to sea to ride out the storm. last year, hurricane irene caused the loss of power for more than six million households in the mid-atlantic and the northeastern u.s. forecasters say sandy could leave even more in dark. today, millions of people like robin ledbetter are nervously calculating their chances how likely do you think it is that you're going to need this generator? >> um, i-- like maybe 50%. >> reporter: just north of here, the governor of delaware has ordered a mandatory evacuation of many coastal areas. north of that, on the coast of new jersey, is elaine quijano. elaine. >> reporter: well, chip, this storm could make landfall somewhere between delaware bay and long island sound monday night into tuesday morning, but here in new jersey, the governor has already declared a state of emergency and the weather conditions are expected to begin deteriorating here tonight. >> i'm taking it seriously. >> reporter: james bradley said in 25 years here in point pleasant beach, he'd only boarded up once. now he's doing it again. >> it's reality first time a
at the outer point yacht club, after past storms like irene isabelle and agnus, many learned the hard way to prepare for the worst. >> it could have high winds for two days, and potentially higher than normal tides. it's low down to where we were on the beach, the beach stuff, we took everything up the hill and on the trailer, stick it in the garage, and when it goes by we truck it back out. >> reporter: the county has people on stands by. along with swift water rescue crews, if and when flooding occurs. that is expected. also, power outages are expected but they are out of their control. asking you to do simple things. have flashlights and have fresh batteries and at least three days worth of fresh drinking water, for each person in your household, then you will be better prepared, should and when the lights go off. jeff hager, abc2 news. >>> flooding from hurricane sandy is a big concern down in annapolis. don harrison tells us what the capitol is doing get ready for sandy. >> hurricane sandy, is on the way. >> the mayor and his emergency management team are checking everything being th
-or-treating. >> reporter: now even if irene -- i'm sorry, even if sandy only hits land as a category 1, everyone remembers that last year irene was a relatively low strength storm but caused 15 billion dollars in damages. reporting live, i'm randall pinkston, back to you ann. >>> the water is back on but the people living on treasure island can't use it. what left them without water for nearly 12 hours and what they have to do now to keep from getting sick. >> did somebody mention water? well, by now i'm certain you've heard rain is in the halloween forecast. we fired up the live top top. the tea you -- doppler radar. the day you should anticipate the rain to begin, as eyewitness news continues on cbs 5. woman: oh! tully's. how do you always have my favorite coffee? well, inside the brewer, there's a giant staircase. and the room is filled with all these different kinds of coffee and even hot cocoa. and you'll always find your favorite. woman #2: with so many choices, keurig has everyone's favorite. i just press this button. brew what you love, simply. keurig. magnitude quake struck can's western coast ab
. >> larry, people are comparing this storm to last year's hurricane irene the tenth costliest in history. now from its command center today, home depot sending sump pumps, shop vacs anticipating lining irene a lot of coastal and inland flooding. for home depot that means demand for carpeting picks up after the storm. if there's any extra profit for the retail that comes out of this storm it comes from demand not pricing. home depot locked in prices this morning just to make sure that consumers will not get gouged. as for paying for the property, property and casualty insurers in good shape thanks to higher premiums and a lack of major events. a major storm may allow some of them to pass on higher prices to their clients. restaurants will see business decline. restaurants like this group you see here can take solace from the fact the storm is hitting did your the slow part of their week. as for the power provider the big exposure these four have in the mid-atlantic region where the heaviest rains and flooded is forecast. any earnings risk lies in prolonged outages in those areas. farther
, for hurricane irene, we expected the worst. we had no idea what to expect. the damage is something -- it is definitely something [indiscernible] >> i guess there are an awful lot of people who will need help and it will be sometime before n.y. get back to normal again. >> getting all of the areas that were damaged help and for people out of power, it is going to be a big operation. >> thank you very much indeed for talking to us. i hope your community center gets pumped out very quickly. that me give you a bit more on this levee we heard about in northern new jersey. it is flooding towns with four to 5 feet of water in the wake of hurricane sandy according to officials at. we are in rescue mode according to the chief executive. what we have been hearing from local people is what has happened is there was a trailer park there which has been inundated and people have been climbing onto their roofs of their trailers for safety and waiting to be rescued been that there is obviously now a major rescue operation unfolding now in that county in northern new jersey. obviously we will keep
is that we kind of had those same warnings for irene. i don't want people to go, oh, they just say that all the time just to get our attention. but, no, there is potential for some dire stuff going on here. and we're talking about power down -- power lines down, trees down, all kinds of other things. finally the computers are agreeing. and you can see a couple doing loops. if this thing does a loop right over new york or new jersey or pennsylvania, that means 24 to 36 hours of rain coming down an inch in an hour. do the math. that's a couple feet of potential water. here we go. the potential impacts, i think the coastal infland flooding the biggest. obviously we saw that in vermont from irene. the waves will be larger than 30 feet battering long island, new rhode island all the way to massachusetts and new jersey depending on where it lands. coastal erosion. we could lose homes as the beach gets washed away and power outages could be in the millions taking literally maybe a week to get all those power lines back up. and that could be far enough that it could affect the election. wolf. >> br
evacuations in the past 14 months. the problem is 14 months ago turn hurricane irene, that just perhapses, it does not do the damage everybody predicted. a lot of people that evacuated suffered more with the evacuation centers than those who stayed behind. everybody was worried that people would say, that's the lesson they learned, they're going to stay behind this time. we see a lot of people sticking around. couple of bars are open, they're having hurricane parties. everything isn't so bad right now, but the partyings going to be turning a lot of danger real soon if everybody sticks around tonight. there's no way in or out now. the main highways into this town are now shut down. and police are now using emergency vehicles, four wheel drives, they can't use police cars to get around. and a lot of these veteran officers are telling me if they drive around they're seeing streets flooded they've never seen, even big puddles on and this again, long before the worst of this stuff hits here in new jersey. tony, allison. >> steve, that is extraordinary. as you said, great concern because the wo
wanted to give you a sense of what is going on here n. this area, irene came through here and called to minor flooding last year. people remember that and already since we have been out here, we have seen the tide start to rise and they can get higher, excuse me, on sunday because of a full moon and that can help the fuel -- to fuel sandy's fury. >> you mentioned folks already leary after experiencing irene. have you talked to people, are they planning to evacuate? are they planning to ride the storm out? what are their plans? >> a lot of people taking a wait-and-see approach and sandy is not expected to hit until sunday or tuesday and you have some people joking about it and others were taking it seriously. one lady was riding here by on a bike who said to man up, there is not going to be a major storm here. and another guy is stocking up on some party favors, not going to say what they are getting ready to have a party once sandy hits. >> we know people like to have fun but this is a serious situation out there. amari fleming, thank you very much for the update tonight. >> and, gar
. the mayor here wants to make sure people don't get complacent, basis year ago, hurricane irene, they had all these dire warnings, and it really didn't do much to this city. he wants to make sure they understand that this time there really could be some severe flooding, a storm surge of 4-eight of 8 feet which would mean where i'm standing will certainly be underwater. he's warning people in the low-lying parts of the island to prepare to evacuate. he said power could be out for days. they need a disaster supply kit. it's very important that people don't get complacent based on what happened a year ago because this one could be much worse. bob. >> schieffer: all right, thank you, my friend. chip reid in maryland. let's go now to cbs news correspondent elaine quijano. she is at point pleasant beach, new jersey this morning. elaine, what's the latest there? >> reporter: good morning to you, bob. well, governor chris christie has declared a statement of emergency here in new jersey, and he's also ordered the mandatory evacuation for residents who live on the barrier islands. that begin at 4:00 t
it's a road block. it's preventing anything from turning back out to sea. even irene moved up along the coast and parallel but scooted on out. that central atlantic block is probablyin probably going to force the storm westward. the cold pool over the eastern united states, that's the winter storm you were referring to you. you take all the tropical energy, all the heat from the tropices, you combine it with winter cold, that's an explosive infreedient in the atmosphere and that's why we think this storm has so much potential. i encourage everybody to pay attention to what their local emergency management personnel tell them. >> pelley: the last major hurricane to hit the u.s. this late in the season, was wilma, seven years ago today. that was a category three storm. it killed five people in florida and caused more than $20 billion in damage. it's the third costliest hurricane in the u.s. after andrew and katrina. we are down to the last 12 days of campaign 2012. a new poll out tonight suggests that mitt romney has closedly the gender gap. last month, president obama led among women
of the season. with memories of hurricane irene fresh on everyone's minds, hurricane companies are bracing for the worst. >> getting our resources ready, making sure the people are ready, getting everything in order. >> reporter: in maryland, batteries, radiators, and generators flew off the shelves. >> talking five or six days possibility, therefore, you got to set a plan for that. >> reporter: planning that could save lives. hurricane sandy is blamed for 21 deaths across the caribbean. in cuba, nine people were killed as sandy toppled houses, ripped off roofs, and flooded neighborhoods. in the dominican republic, flash flooding buried cars and trees under water. and in jamaica, most of the eastern part of the island remains without power, and even now, flash flooding remains a danger. >> right now, that area right there. >> reporter: now faced with news of sandy's destructive potential, those living in her path can only do their best as they prepare for the worst. >> last week we talked about the fact we hadn't had any hurricanes this year, and here we are. >> reporter: the storm surge
: there is. people here dealt with hurricane irene a year ago and they are taking this one even more seriously. the mandatory evacuation is up until 8:00 p.m. tonight. people are boarding up their homes and businesses and heading out of town. they are patiently waiting in line at gas stations and taking it seriously and getting out. >> susan mcginnis, thank you. >> and brian, you have been watching this storm. how has it been looking from our advantage? >> it is on track off the coast of new england and moving parallel to the shoreline as you can see right now. the hurricane force winds will overspread the east coast by tomorrow morning. we will have the latest on cbs this morning beginning at 4:30 arm on monday. you can see right now they are picking up rein and winds. the full moon tomorrow will be combined with the storm to increase the risk of storm surge from all of this. so, not only will there be winds approaching hurricane strength, but flooding, 6 to 12 inches of rain mikely near the path of this -- likely near the path of this and power gusts of up to 40 miles per hou
the outer banks, they're worried that could be washed out, parts of it, as happened back with irene. people are paying close attention to the radar, watching the track of the storm. just to see how it affects this area. >> but clearly, george, the streets are pretty dezrted around there, are they not? a lot of vacation homes, as you mentioned, some folks who are living there kind of part time. of those who have decided to kind of wait out the storm, are you hearing very much from them? >> they're seeking higher ground. they're not leaving the island. some people have left, but a lot of people are staying to ride the storm out, going to hotels, going to areas around the outer banks here where they know it's higher ground. they also know the spots that flood. and that's what they're keeping an eye on. >> thanks so much, george. we'll check back with you momentarily. meantime, let's head north now. virginia is one of the places that is also concerned about what the storm could bring. athena jones is in a really beautiful part of virginia, northern virginia now, old town alexandria where it loo
, irene didn't do too much to new york city. but it certainly did a lot to vermont. and will this storm do something similar as it's stalling. here all the models bringing it up from the city down to about washington, d.c. but the big thing is it stops, it stops moving for 48 hours and it could rain for two days and make flooding. if it rains a half an inch an hour for 48 hours, that's two feet of rain in any one spot. that is going to cause significant flash flooding and the potential for big loss of life. >> chad, thanks for the update. we may well come back to you before the end of the show. appreciate it. >>> let's get back to politics and the subject of race. outspoken conservative ann coulter has a lot to say about just about everything, in fact. the new subject of her new book is "mugged, racial demagoguery" dedicated to quote, the freest black man in america. we'll discover who that is. ann coulter, welcome back. >> thank you. good to be here. >> i know you have been struggling with a bit of a cold. >> you have an unfair advantage about it tonight. >> you have been whining about it
feet. that was with hurricane donna in 1960. with irene they had a 9-foot surge. it is expected to be between 10 and 12 feet at the battery, and that would be major flooding for the new york city harbor as well as the long island sound, the water. >> we heard a lot if our reporters mention how cold it is. this is a cold. you would never believe this is a tropical system, and that's because it's in the process of becoming a winter system. here is your planner, at 7:00 at 50 degrees with the gust of 50 to 05. we're already picking up a few spots getting 70 miles per hour gusts. we keep it going at 9:00. and big winds of 60 to 65, gusting at 10 with a temperature of 48 degrees. much more to come. we'll squeeze the forecast in and give you hope in case you're tired of hurricane sandy and her many facets. >> back to you. >> i'm looking at the three-day forecast. i don't need 7 days. >> just give us wednesday or thursday, too. >> yeah. >> it's not just your life that's being put on hold. the presidential campaign is on hold as a result of sandy. >> president obama monitoring the track
management officials tell us that here if you were impacted by irene, you're probably going to be hit by sandy. there's a lot of possibilities here in new jersey, coastal flooding, inland flooding, high winds and of course power outages and today accordingly we saw many people stocking up at the store batteries, water, food, one woman stocking up for as much as five days, people were pulling their boats out of the water and generally bracing for what could be a pretty major storm once again here in new jersey. >> thank you so much for the update. i think everybody is doing a little bit of the same thing up and down the east coast. thanks for giving us an update from there tonight. >>> just as we heard from adrian and as we have been hearing from you, gary and sue, a lot of possibilities here. >> absolutely and i'll be the first one to tell you that i hope we are wrong and this thing goes out to sea. but looking at the setup meteorologically with the big trough to the west of us and a big area of high pressure to the east of us, kind of making a roadway for this hurricane to come right
dealing with hurricane irene, how they their that and what they're doing differently this time and really, for the most part, there is not a lot of panic here in annapolis where we are. people are like it's coming, we're ready, we'll deal with the rest then. that's the latest here from annapolis, we don't have much more. we'll leave you with that wonderful shot with the little girl and her rain boots, and the ducks. don't terrorize the ducks children. >> thanks senator sunshine today. >>> we do have a reminder for you, metro is closed today. that includes all rail, bus, and met access service. the federal government is closed. dc government ofices are also closed, and so are mescals across the region. for a full list of closures, go to, we're also running the closures on the top of your screen. >>> airlines servicing reagan national and dulles international airports canceled most flights for the day. they've canceled the flights. others plan to stay open. they are monitoring things as the storm rolls through. bwi marshall also reported limited operation. passengers are being u
here. we've dealt with snowmageddon. we survived irene a few years back. some of us remember agnes, a mother of all storms, we're still here, still standing. as we will be after this one as a memory. here's the second reason. it might not be as bad as it could be. let's put our collective energy together and send that thought out into the universe. always keep in mind, though, the fundamental truth that my aunt used to lay on me all the time, boy, she said, youe got to remember, that man poses and god disposes. >> amen. >> take a deep breath. >>> "nightly news" next. [ earnest ] out of the blue one day, we were told to build a 30-foot stage. gathered the guys and we built that 30-foot stage, not knowing what it was for. just days later, all three shifts were told to assemble in the warehouse. a group of people walked out on that stage and told us that the plant is now closed and all of you are fired... i looked both ways, i looked at the crowd, and...we all just lost our jobs. we don't have an income. mitt romney made over 100 million dollars by shutting down our plant and devastat
during irene. i want. i live across the river. they were -- they say they're fine but i said get observe here, i'll take you home. >> any word on when they will come out? are officials going for them in boats or trucks? do you know when they're going to arrive? >> looks staggered. i got one aunt and took her to a cousin's house. yeah, go outside, flag someone down. >> right. it's hard to get information. best of luck. this is the case. officials are doing the best they can but it's hard to keep tabs who is here, who is not. we see cars streaming in all the time as people go in. water here. there are towels, dry clothes. people are coming off trucks and boats with just the clothes on their back, maybe a small bag, some have no shoes. trying to get them as much as they need. officials on the teeterboro airport came over looking for someone saying we've got supplies, we want to help you out and give you supplies. imagine officials more than happy to hear that. but these residents are absolutely shocked. not expecting this. this was not an evacuation zone. >> i can relate to your guest there
during hurricane irene last year, the county administrative building in upper marlboro had significant damage from flooding. so now they have these inflatable sand bags that they have ready to deploy if flooding becomes a problem. that's the latest here in forestville, back to you. >> thank you. >>> now we want to check in with julie wright. she's got a look at traffic. >> busy on the south side of town. traffic is congested and this is why, coming towards the wilson bridge on the inner loop, accident activity in the local lanes, slowing down to about 22 miles per hour headed in the direction of alexandria. northbound 210 at kirby road, delays beginning at palmer road. headed into southeast, heavy and slow because of a stalled car, inbound on the douglas bridge. watch for police direction to help direct you through. southbound 270, delays down to 31 miles per hour. gridlocked out of germantown at 16 miles per hour. and 35 miles per hour to wrap up your commute coming in from rockdale. that's a check of your fox 5 on- time traffic. >>> new this morning, a suspicious death investigation
of practice with stuff like this, whether it's irene a week ago, isaac, months ago and we're mobilizing blood, making sure the blood supply needs to be in the key areas of the country. >> rick: the last minute preparations, there isn't a lot of time left. any last minute thing you can suggest to people that they do? >> the most important thing right now in the last minute if there's little time to get out and make sure you've got the food and water you need in terms of your kit, is to have a battery operated radio, something that can give you the ability to listen to any evacuation orders or any emergency notices that may be going out. >> rick: all right, charles one last thing-- >> mention that the red cross has-- >> that's exactly where i was going to lead you i saw the phone in your hand and talk about an app? >> i am going to talk about a hurricane app. the red cross has a hurricane app that's available for apple and android, folks can download it, it's got a tremendous "i'm safe" feature that allows people with a one push of a button let friends and family know they're safe and an import
. the east coast of the u.s. and variety of events in the past, last year irene resell the surge on the kinetic coast and elsewhere. -- irene last year and elsewhere. >> time for one last question. >> your line is open. >> this storm already is proving to be a major flood event. i was hoping you could speak to what you will be doing in terms of immediate air emergency response and then speak to the coast guard about people having to evacuate people and what you're doing to help communities that have been flooded in the coming weeks. take a safety first. not only are we dealing with coastal flooding, but inland flooding. -- >> safety first. first thing is search and rescue. the assistance will be based upon the needs. the first question is, are they going to need housing assistance? we have already looked at the availability of housing stock, rental properties if we have the housing commission. we are anticipating what the needs are, though we will not know exactly until we see the impact. we are preparing with flight safety, immediate needs, housing, and then moving to recovery.
, would be more dangerous than even irene from last year. it turned out to be a huge flood problem for virginia, vermont and new jersey. i know it's late in the season, but the water is still warm enough to make this storm generate. it went -- i was watch it last night in bed on my -- i was tweeting from 8:00 until 12:00, and this thing went from an 80-mile-per-hour storm to about a 115 as it left jamaica and slammed into cuba, and that was only in five hours. there's a lot of potential. >> is it true that a late storm as well could be a lot deadlier, a lot more dangerous late in the season? >> i would say an earlier storm, october 10th, that peak day with the waters the warmest would be the most concerning, but i think people probably take it less serious. oh, come on, it's november. it can't happen. there's not going to be anything bad. if you let your guard down and think that it's out of season, you're wrong. look at the waves there. is that miami? somewhere. look at that. the way it's crashing on. that's why you can't even be on the sea wall. you need to be behind it and in th
irene. the strongest winds may be 100 to 150 miles north. southern jersey, delaware, maryland, the highest winds maybe up there in connecticut and new york city. it's a big, broad storm. that's the most important thing. and if you're north of that center, we have big issues and big concerns with storm surge and coastal flooding. that will probably be the epic ending to this storm. that's probably what everyone will remember is what happens to the beaches in new jersey, possibly connecticut, rhode island and long island if the storm does come ashore down there in southern jersey. all of these little lines are possible paths. we still haven't ruled out a direct impact into areas of new england either. there's still some questions to be answered. the bottom line is starting on sunday afternoon and evening, mid-atlantic and northeast, it's too late to prepare. you have today, you have tomorrow and then be prepared to stay in your house with your family and kids. most of monday and maybe even into tuesday. i'll have updates throughout the show here. stay tuned. new york city, sunri
. into conversations, there has been discussions that perhaps down the road may be enrichment on irene cho can be accepted. perhaps at some point, we don't know when, some of the sanctions, could be lifted. secondly, to president obama's credit, he is no saddam hussein. which means that when saddam hussein made a decision, you either agree with it or you would die if you're inside the iraqi political establishment. saddam did not have to deal with a pesky congress nor did he have to do with an israeli prime minister. as a result, the iranians have the confidence that saddam had the strength to be able to live up to his end of the bargain. that is not the perception that the iranians have, rightly or wrongly, about president obama. can president obama promise the lifting of sanctions, most of these sanctions that really are hurting their rings have gone through congress and now to be lifted if there's a congressional district. can anyone here remember last time congress lifted sanctions in a swift manner? moreover, the principal level that establishes the principle of reciprocity. the idea that
, under the name of irene dunne. at my age i have some from time to time started thinking about the end of things and it has occurred to me when my time does come i hope to go the way my dear old grand father did, quietly in his sleep, not screaming like the passengers in his car. [laughter] andrew made me laugh more than anybody i have ever met. we all loved andrew and andrew loved us. my wife, ali mills, was, loved so much by andrew and he said, i never dreamed that i would be in the same family with the mother from ""the wonder years"". he was so full of heart. the think i love most about andrew in terms his public persona how people on the left hated him until they met him and they started loving him. the "new yorker", sent a woman out to l.a. where we all live to do a piece on him. they did a long piece. she spent 10 days. brought the woman over to our house to meet us. i thought they would do a hatchet job. they did a love letter. she loved him. she couldn't say bad things about him. "new york times" wrote two major pieces about him in the last year of his life and they were both
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)